Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine (DMIN)

  • DMIN 1100 
    Basics of Nuclear Medicine

    3  credit hours

    History and evolution of Nuclear Medicine as an imaging modality. Radionuclide identification, radionuclide energies and half-lives, and commonly used radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine procedures. Introduction to Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine procedures. Patient handling techniques and nursing and laboratory procedures relating to Nuclear Medicine. Introduction to professional medical ethics, legal issues and patient rights. Quality assurance procedures for the radiation protection of Nuclear Medicine personnel. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • DMIN 1101 
    Physics & Instrumentation Nuclear Medicn

    6  credit hours

    Principles of atomic structure, nomenclature and radiation. Introduction to radionuclides, physics of radiation (particulate and non-particulate), natural and artificial radiation, calculations of radioactive decay, exponential equations, calculation of radiation dosimetry, half-life equations, radionuclide production, radiopharmaceutical dose determinations, radiation interactions with matter, radiation protection and safety methodology, radiation shielding formulation and counting statistics. Basic aspects in imaging and non-imaging radiation detection instrumentation including: scintillation detectors, planar, SPECT (single photon emission computerized tomography), PET (positron emission tomography), multichannel analyzers, quality assurance testing for Nuclear Medicine instrumentation including G-M detectors, ionization chambers and scintillation detectors. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • DMIN 1102 
    Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmacy

    6  credit hours

    Nuclear Medicine radiopharmacy including: production of radionuclides, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, radiopharmaceuticals and methods of radiolabeling, characteristics of specific radiopharmaceuticals, biorouting and physiological mechanisms of tracer uptake, phamacokinetics, radiation units, specific activity, concentration determination, dose calculations, methods of dispensing, quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals, and universal precautions. Specialized clinical radiopharmaceuticals include: monoclonal antibodies, peptides, receptors, Positron Emission Tomography, therapy, and current research. Radiopharmacy design, management and record keeping, radiation safety and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) radiopharmacy rules and regulations. Prerequisite: Admission to Nuclear Medicine Technology program and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 1100, Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 1101, and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 1111 or equivalent or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours, 4 lab hours))

  • DMIN 1103 
    Radiation Biology & Safety Bridge

    2  credit hours

    Topics in radiation biology will include qualitative and quantitative effects on the human body following exposure to various types of ionizing radiation, and the potential harmful effects and the benefits of the medical uses of radiation. Procedures for personnel and environmental monitoring, emergency management, decontamination, and proper methods of receiving, storing and disposing of radioactive materials. Basic concepts of radiation exposure reduction. Concepts of radiation safety for personnel, patients and the environment. Prerequisite: Admission to Nuclear Medicine Technology program or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 1 lab hour)

  • DMIN 1111 
    Clinical Nuclear Medicine I

    3  credit hours

    First in a three-course sequence of supervised clinical instruction in Nuclear Medicine Technology. Comprehensive study of imaging and non-imaging techniques, instrumentation quality control, patient care, radiopharmacy, computer analysis and quality assurance. Students are expected to demonstrate competency according to defined objectives at prospective clinical affiliates. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program or consent of instructor

  • DMIN 1840 
    Independent Study

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program and consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • DMIN 2200 
    Nuclear Medicine Procedures II

    4  credit hours

    Applied anatomy and physiology of cardiovascular, skeletal, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, respiratory and endocrine systems. Diagnostic imaging techniques, radiopharmaceutical agents, indications and limitations of nuclear medicine procedures, normal and abnormal pathology, dosimetry. Computer acquisition and processing techniques. Case study critiques, journal review and case study presentations. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 1100 and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 1103 or consent of instructor. Admission to program is required. (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • DMIN 2202 
    Nuclear Medicine Procedures III

    4  credit hours

    Applied anatomy and physiology of the central nervous, immune, lymphatic, hematopoietic, exocrine, gastrointestinal systems. Non-imaging tests including Schilling's, Helibacter pylori and blood volume determination. Advanced topics in nuclear cardiology, tumor imaging, neurology, radioimmunoimaging, radioimmunotherapy and miscellaneous procedures. Diagnostic imaging techniques, radiopharmaceutical agents, indications and limitations of nuclear medicine procedures, normal and abnormal pathology, dosimetry. Computer acquisition and processing techniques. Case study critiques, journal review and case study presentations. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 2200 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • DMIN 2211 
    Clinical Nuclear Medicine II

    3  credit hours

    Second in a three-course sequence of supervised clinical instruction in Nuclear Medicine Technology. Comprehensive study of imaging and non-imaging techniques, instrumentation quality control, patient care, radiopharmacy, computer analysis and quality assurance. Students are expected to demonstrate competency according to defined objectives at prospective clinical affiliates. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 1111 or consent of instructor

  • DMIN 2212 
    Clinical Nuclear Medicine III

    3  credit hours

    Third in a three-course sequence of supervised clinical instruction in Nuclear Medicine Technology. Comprehensive study of imaging and non-imaging techniques, instrumentation quality control, patient care, radiopharmacy, computer analysis and quality assurance. Students are expected to demonstrate competency according to defined objectives at prospective clinical affiliates. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 2211 or consent of instructor

  • DMIN 2221 
    PET/CT

    3  credit hours

    Physics, instrumentation and radiochemistry of PET (Positron Emission Tomography). Quality assurance of the PET and PET-CT (computerized tomography) instrumentation. Physiological, biochemical and pharmacological mechanisms of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation safety and protection. Clinical PET imaging in neurological, cardiovascular, oncological and psychiatric disorders. Image reconstruction and display protocols. Case study presentations and journal review. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 2202 and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 2211 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • DMIN 2222 
    Nuclear Medicine Review Seminar

    1  credit hour

    Prepares students for the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board Examination (NMTCB). Test taking tips and practice exams. Practical application of patient care, human anatomy and physiology, pathology, radiation biology, radiation protection, physics, instrumentation, radiopharmacy, in vivo and in vitro procedures, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine procedures, Positron Emission Tomography. Students will complete a registry review project and a mock registry. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology program and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 2202 and Diagnostic Medical Imaging Nuclear Medicine 2211 or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour)

  • DMIN 2860 
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • DMIN 2865 
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

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