Economics (ECONO)

  • ECONO 1110 
    Consumer Economics and Personal Finance

    3  credit hours

    An overview of personal and family financial planning. Emphasis is placed on financial recordkeeping, consumer spending, tax planning, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. (3 lecture hours)

  • ECONO 1800 
    Special Project

    1 to 3  credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates and experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.)

  • ECONO 1840 
    Independent Study

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • ECONO 2200 (IAI S3 900)
    Principles of Economics

    3  credit hours

    A survey course addressing macroeconomics and microeconomics. A study of product and resource markets, market structures, interactions between government and firms, the determinants of economic activity, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy implications, international trade, and international finance. This course is not recommended for Economics majors or those pursuing a baccalaureate degree in any field of business. Not for credit if credit earned in Economics 2201 or Economics 2202 or their equivalent. (3 lecture hours)

  • ECONO 2201 (IAI S3 901)
    Macroeconomics and the Global Economy

    3  credit hours

    A study of the major factors that determine levels of economic activity. Emphasis is placed on resource allocation, national production, demand and supply, income levels, government, money and the banking system, policy implications, economic growth, international finance and exchange rates. A score of 53 or higher in algebra domain of Math Placement Test is recommended. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • ECONO 2202 (IAI S3 902)
    Microeconomics and the Global Economy

    3  credit hours

    A study of consumer behavior, supply and demand, price determination, market structures, factor pricing, international trade and finance, and economic development. Special topics may include agricultural economics, the economics of risk, environmental economics and alternative economic systems. A score of 53 or higher in algebra domain of Math Placement Test and successful completion of Economics 2201 are recommended. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • ECONO 2210 
    Money and Banking

    3  credit hours

    A descriptive, historical and analytical introduction to the role of money, monetary policy, financial institutions and central banks in the United States and internationally. Prerequisite: Economics 2201 and Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • ECONO 2220 
    Comparative Economic Systems

    3  credit hours

    A comparison of the principal economic systems, their theoretical foundations and historical backgrounds. Economic analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the capitalist, socialist and communist systems. Developing nations are studied within their own unique paradigm and with current strategies for economic development. Prerequisite: Economics 2201 or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • ECONO 2800 
    Special Project

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the discipline, while building upon academic knowledge and skills acquired in introductory-level classes. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporated an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of more complex discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of the instructor

  • ECONO 2860 
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • ECONO 2865 
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • ECONO 2870 
    Internship (Transfer)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • ECONO 2871 
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

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