Geography (GEOGR)

  • GEOGR 1100 (IAI S4 901)
    Western World Geography

    3  credit hours

    This regional survey will examine the diverse geographic aspects of countries that are deemed to be part of the Western World: Anglo America, Latin America, Europe, Russia and Australia/New Zealand. The interrelationship between people and their geographic environments (physical, social, economic, political, demographic, cultural, historical environments) will be considered. Coverage of countries and regions in this course will range from specific locational descriptions to consideration of broad regional elements. Students will be expected to learn basic place names, to understand geographic relationships and concepts as found in and among these countries, and to learn to think geographically. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1105 (IAI S4 902N)
    Eastern World Geography

    3  credit hours

    This regional survey will examine the diverse geographic aspects of countries that are deemed to be part of the Eastern World: Southwest Asia and North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, East Asia, South Asia, and Central Asia. The interrelationship between people and their geographic environments (physical, social, economic, political, demographic, cultural, historical environments) will be considered. Coverage of countries and regions in this course will range from specific locational descriptions to consideration of broad regional elements. Students will be expected to learn basic place names, to understand geographic relationships and concepts as found in these countries, and to learn to think geographically. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1107 
    Introduction to Geography

    3  credit hours

    A fundamental overview of the methods geographers use to interpret the world. Includes economic, political, cultural and urban geography, as well as geomorphology and biogeography. Also introduces the various tools geographers use from Geographic Information Systems to maps. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1108 
    Geographic Skills: Regional

    3  credit hours

    Development of geographic skills such as map reading, air photo interpretation, and navigation. Tools such as Geographic Information Systems and Google Earth are introduced. Chicagoland, Illinois, and the United States form the spatial foci of the class. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1110 
    Political Geography

    3  credit hours

    An exploration of power and space relations. This course explores how political decisions and processes impact people and their environs, as well as the meaning, history, implications, and combinations of the concepts of nation and state. It will explore the background and nature of borders, country shapes, regional conflicts, and boundary disputes and also compare major political systems and electoral geography. Students will also explore the politics of globalization, trade and trade agreements, and international law. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1120 (IAI S4 903N)
    Economic Geography

    3  credit hours

    An overview of the spatial distribution of economic activities and resultant economic landscapes. This course includes the study of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions, neoliberal and participatory economics, the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and World Trade Organization. Structural Adjustment Programs and the impact of free-market economics on traditional economies are examined. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1130 (IAI S4 900N)
    Cultural Geography

    3  credit hours

    An introduction to geographic perspectives on such cultural topics as population, language, ethnicity, politics, religion, economics, and urbanization. Geographic themes such as spatial analysis, sense of place, region, diffusion, globalization, cultural ecology, and cultural landscape are highlighted. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1140 (IAI S4 901)
    Urban Geography

    3  credit hours

    A geographical examination of settlement patterns, economic activities, usage of space and representations in the urban environment. The form and function of cities are analyzed, as are issues of disenfranchisement and gentrification. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1151 
    Geographic Information Systems I

    3  credit hours

    An introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with examples of applications in various fields. Use GIS software to capture, store, query, analyze and display spatially referenced data such as roads, land parcels and vegetations stands on the earth's surface. GIS software usage is covered by tutorial exercises in textbook, with assistance by instructor. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • GEOGR 1152 
    Geographic Information Systems II

    3  credit hours

    Focuses on the principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and emphasizes building skills using ESRI software. This course includes data structure, assembly of GIS data sets, map symbology, queries, spatial analysis, coordinate systems, projections and map presentation. GIS software usage is covered by tutorial exercises in textbook, with assistance by instructor. Students may also work to develop their own GIS projects. Prerequisite: Geography 1151 or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • GEOGR 1153 
    Applied Geographic Information Systems

    3  credit hours

    An opportunity for students to learn through real-life GIS projects developed by public safety officials, public works departments, planners and other industry professionals. Prerequisite: Proficiency with the Windows operating system required; Geography 1151 and Geography 1152 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours, 1 lab hour)

  • GEOGR 1154 
    Geodatabase Development

    3  credit hours

    Advanced study of Geodatabase development, maintenance, organization and editing within the ArcGIS suite of software. Students will explore the basic features and functionality that a geodatabase provides, as well as the ArcMap editing tools for creating and editing the geometry of spatial data stored in a geodatabase. Students will learn to create and manipulate Geographic Information Systems features that mimic real-world feature behavior, apply sophisticated rules and relationships between features, and access geospatial data from a centralized location. Prerequisite: Geography 1153 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1155 
    GIS Capstone Project

    3  credit hours

    Focus on student created projects solving problems in the fields of environmental science, marketing, urban planning, resource management and homeland security. Students will learn to draft a Geographic Information Systems proposal, which will include project timelines, system scope, cost-benefit analysis, risk planning, and delivering a final GIS product. Instructor will assist students with project topics, project approach, the availability and acquisition of source data, data organization and assembly, data preparation, GIS analysis techniques and project presentation. Throughout the course, instructor will guide students through the process of gaining GIS employment, including resume building, job interview techniques and obtaining national GISCI (Geographic Information Systems Certification Institute) status. Prerequisite: Geography 1154 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1800 
    Special Project

    1 to 3  credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for Geography. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific geographic topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in Geography. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.). This course may be taken four times for credit.

  • GEOGR 1820 
    Selected Topics I

    1 to 3  credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 1840 
    Independent Study

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 2204 
    Russia

    3  credit hours

    This course examines the diverse geographic aspects of Russia and the former Soviet Union. The interrelationship between people and their geographic environments - physical, social, economic, political, demographic, cultural environments - are considered. Students are expected to learn basic place names, to understand geographic relationships and concepts as found in Russia and the former Soviet Union, and to think geographically about this region. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 2210 
    United States and Canada

    3  credit hours

    A regional survey of the United States and Canada. Topics may include: Agriculture, manufacturing, the territorial expansion of the United States, Quebec separatism, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), gentrification, and urbanization. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 2220 
    Latin America

    3  credit hours

    A dynamic survey of Latin America and its countries. An array of topics will be addressed, ranging from physical landscapes to US foreign policy towards the region. The emergence of post-colonial countries, control of natural resources, and the significance of trade/shipping routes are key components of this class. Additionally, students should expect substantial discussion of debt and neoliberalism, international organizations, and trade agreements. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 2221 
    Mexico

    3  credit hours

    A geographical exploration and analysis of Mexico. Topics covered may include physical landscape, economic conditions, the "War on Drugs," Structural Adjustment and the International Monetary Fund, the North American Free Trade Agreement, the militarization of the U.S.-Mexico border, the Mexican Diaspora, and Mexican communities in the United States. (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 2235 
    The Middle East

    3  credit hours

    A geographical exploration and analysis of the Middle East. This course provides a survey of the region through a geographic perspective. Included are country locations and discussion of physical features, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, U.S. foreign policy towards the region, the exploitation of resources (particularly oil), U.S. interventions in Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan, and discussion relating to the "War on Terror" and the rise of "radical Islam." (3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 2820 
    Advanced Selected Topics I

    1 to 3  credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor. (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • GEOGR 2860 
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • GEOGR 2865 
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • GEOGR 2870 
    Internship (Transfer)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • GEOGR 2871 
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

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