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Chemistry 2552: Organic Chemistry
Pet Molecule

Marge Peters · (630) 942-2337 · petersm@cod.edu

Choosing | Properties/Uses/Hazards | History | Synthesis | Reactions | Other Resources | Interlibrary Loan | Other Libraries | Citing Sources


1: SELECTING YOUR MOLECULE: CHOOSE CAREFULLY!

An experimental drug you read about recently might be difficult to research because data about the compound is just being published. Established compounds with important medical or manufacturing uses are among the chemicals the Library is most likely to have information on.

If you find virtually no information about your pet molecule in these sources, you know that you will have to dig for data and probably visit a library with more chemistry sources than the Library has.

Scan for information on a potential molecule in these sources. Make note of the CAS Registry Number when you find it and any patent numbers listed:

2: SOURCES FOR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, USES AND HAZARDS

Databases and Websites:

General Reference Resources

Drug Information :

Foods and Cosmetics :

Plastics and Polymers :

Chemical Hazards:

3: SOURCES FOR HISTORY OF MOLECULE

Many of the sources listed under Physical Properties will include the history of the compound. You may also want to check your compound in the indexes of biographical sources such as these:

Also, be sure to check the indexes of books on the history of chemistry in General QD 11.

The Library rarely has entire books on a specific organic compound, but it is worthwhile to check the COD Library Catalog for your subject. There are books on aspirin, caffeine, ethanol (alcoholic drink) and Vitamin C, for instance.

If the Library does not have a book on your topic, think of BROADER TERMS that include it: Carbohydrates, Vitamins, Pesticides, etc. We may have titles on these subjects. Also, check WorldCat, under Library Catalogs. This resource listing over 60 million items owned by libraries worldwide may provide titles published about your molecule.

4: SYNTHESIS

Many of the most useful sources for synthesis of a molecule are on reserve for this class. See list under Reserves for Chemistry 2552. Some titles to try first are Vogel's Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry by Morrison and Boyd, and any book with the word "microscale" in the title. A number of the titles listed under Physical Properties will give synthesis information as well. Organic chemistry textbooks in the General collection numbers QD 251.2 and QD 261 may show the synthesis and reactions of your compound. The Library owns many more guides to microscale experiments. Look under the keyword MICROSCALE in the Library catalog. Avoid examples that list the preparation as "Extraction" or "Distillation"

Reference and Internet Sources:

5: REACTIONS

Many of the best sources for reactions are also on reserve for this class. See list under Reserves for Chemistry 2552 . Some titles to try first are Vogel's Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry by Morrison and Boyd, and any book with the word "microscale" in the title. A number of the titles listed under Physical Properties will give reaction information as well. Organic chemistry textbooks in the General collection numbers QD 251.2 and QD 261 may show the reactions of your compound. The Library owns many guides to microscale experiments. Look under the keyword MICROSCALE in the Library catalog.

Reference and Internet Sources:

6: DATABASE/INTERNET USE FOR OTHER INFORMATION

7: INTERLIBRARY LOAN

8: OTHER LIBRARIES

You may want to visit other libraries with more chemistry sources than the Library has. Some area libraries with good chemistry sections are:

9: CITING SOURCES: ACS, APA, MLA format

 

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