Career Opportunities

Today you can find anthropologists in every segment of the world's businesses, from traditional roles as teachers and researchers to serving as consultants for fortune 100 companies and national governments. Similarly, a significant number of anthropologists have found their skills in demand in fields such as management, medicine and education.

The globalization of American society in terms of our economy, work force, technology and politics makes the undergraduate degree in anthropology attractive. An undergraduate major or minor in anthropology provides a cross-cultural perspective and practical tools, especially when coupled with other academic training and/or certification in such fields as business, health, government, science, behavioral science, education or religious education.

An anthropology degree is useful for anyone going into a field that focuses on working with and understanding people. This includes fields such as training and development, human resource management, sales, public development, medicine, counseling, religious ministry, administration, management, government service, international relations, museum work, national park service, teaching, environmental management, market research, communications, systems analysis, criminal justice and law, to name only a few.

To specialize in anthropological research, students generally need a master's or doctoral degree.