Natural Resources Symposium Series

Got H20?

Thursday, April 20, 2017
9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Student Services Center (SSC), Room 3245

The COD Foundation and COD Environmental Club Present:

The Natural Resources Symposium Series

Got H2O?

Water Resource Challenges Facing Northeastern Illinois

The Natural Resources Symposium Series is free, accessible, and open to the entire COD community and campus. The symposia provide a platform for learning and discussion about contemporary natural resource and environmental issues.

The second symposium of the series – Got H2O? Water Resource Challenges Facing Northeastern Illinois - will explore the contemporary challenges for sustainable management of water resources in northeastern Illinois with a special emphasis on Lake Michigan, local public water supply, and watersheds in DuPage county.

<empty>

To set the stage for the symposium, please join us on Wednesday, April 19 at 7 p.m. for a screening of Living Downstream. Based on the acclaimed book by ecologist and cancer survivor Sandra Steingraber, this poetic film follows Sandra during one pivotal year as she travels across North America, working to break the silence about cancer and its environmental links.

The symposium schedule is available by clicking the Schedule tab on this page.  Learn more about the speakers by clicking the Speaker tab.

The Natural Resources Symposium Series is funded by the COD Foundation and supported by the student membership of the COD Environmental Club.

 

 

 

College of DuPage Foundation   College of DuPage Environmental Club

Symposium Schedule

Thursday, April 20

Student Services Center (SSC), Room 3245

9 a.m. Welcome, Diana Strode, Adam Woodard, Haley Schreiber-Deam

9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Keynote Speaker – Daniel Injerd, Director, Office of Water Resources, Sustainable Water Resource Management in Northeastern Illinois-Are We There?

10:15 to 10:55 a.m. John Hubsky, Superintendent and Rich Daubert, P.E., Glen Ellyn Public Works, The Glen Ellyn Public Water Supply System

10:55 to 11:35 a.m. Anthony Charlton, Director, DuPage County Stormwater Management, Sustainable Management of SubURBAN Water Resources

11:35 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Stephen McCracken, Conservation Foundation, Program Manager—DuPage River Salt Creek Workgroup, Watershed Planning for Meeting the Aquatic Life Goal

Keynote Speaker

Daniel Injerd

Daniel Injerd

Daniel Injerd is the Director of the Office of Water Resources for the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

The Office of Water Resources is the lead state agency for water resources planning, navigation, floodplain management, protection of public waters, the National Flood Insurance Program, the Lake Michigan water allocation program, water supply, drought and interstate organizations on water resources. Interagency duties include the state water plan, drought response, flood emergency situation reports, and the comprehensive review of Illinois water use law.

Previously, he was Chief of the Lake Michigan Management Section for the Office of Water Resources, Illinois Department of Natural Resources. In that capacity, Injerd was responsible for the management of Illinois’ Lake Michigan diversion as allowed under a U.S. Supreme Court Decree and the allocation of Lake Michigan water to 215 public water supplies serving 7 million people in northeastern Illinois.

Injerd represents Illinois on several Great Lakes organizations, having been appointed by Illinois Governor Rauner to the Great Lakes Commission and the Council of Great Lakes Governors’ Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Water Resources Compact Council and the Regional Body.

Injerd has been involved with the Great Lakes for 40 years. His educational background includes a Master of Science in Resource Management from Michigan State University, with a minor in Sanitary Engineering.

John Hubsky is the Utilities Superintendent for Glen Ellyn Public Works. Hubsky has been working for the Village of Glen Ellyn for five years and has 10 years of experience in the operation and maintenance of public sewer and water infrastructure. Hubsky is IEPA Certified as a Class A Public Water Supply Operator and Waste Water Treatment Works Operator. Hubsky attended the University of Michigan, where he studied and obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Resource Ecology and Management. In addition, Hubsky is currently attending Northern Illinois University to obtain a master’s degree in Public Administration. Hubsky and his family reside in Warrenville.

Rich Daubert is a Professional Engineer for Glen Ellyn Public Works. Daubert has been working for the Village of Glen Ellyn for two years and has 12 years of experience in municipal engineering, including public sewer and water infrastructure improvements. Daubert is licensed as a Professional Engineer in the State of Illinois and IEPA Certified as a Class C Public Water Supply Operator. Daubert attended the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he studied and obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering. In addition, Daubert attended Chicago State University and obtained a master’s degree in Secondary Education-Physics. Daubert and his family reside in Arlington Heights.

Anthony Charlton received his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Illinois in 1983. Following this, he began his career at Patrick Engineering until accepting a position as a civil engineer for DuPage County. He has worked for DuPage County in the field of Stormwater Management for the past 32 years, serving as director of the County’s Stormwater Management Department for the past 18 years. During his time at the County, Charlton has overseen a multitude of flood control and water quality projects. Most notably, he oversaw the conversion of the Elmhurst Quarry into a flood control facility in 1995, and it still stands as DuPage’s largest–and most beneficial–facility to date. In recent years, he has directed staff in the completion of more than 30 flood control and habitat enhancement projects.

Stephen McCracken works for the Conservation Foundation and is the Program Manager for the DuPage River Salt Creek Workgroup (DRSCW). He is a graduate of Queens University Belfast (Geo-science) and holds master degrees in both Environmental Science (specializing in water resources, University College of North Wales) and Applied Environmental Economics (Imperial College London). He has 20 years of project management experience gained working in Europe, Africa and North America. He has authored several papers on resource management and water pollution.

In addition to his job, McCracken serves on the Illinois Water Environment Federation Watershed Management Committee and is a regular contributor to the organizations newsletter. He is also a member of DuPage County’s Local Emergency Planning Committee.

Daniel Injerd:Sustainable Water Resource Management in Northeastern Illinois-Are We There?

Northeastern Illinois, while relatively small geographically, contains more than 80 percent of the total Illinois population. Current trends notwithstanding, the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning calls for an additional 2.4 million northeastern Illinois residents by 2040. Ensuring that current and future residents of this region have access to adequate, reliable and safe potable water supplies will require the application of sustainable water resource management principles throughout the metropolitan area.

This presentation will provide an overview of water supply planning in Illinois, with a focus on the heavily populated Northeastern Illinois region. The current condition of shallow and deep aquifer resources, the Lake Michigan Water Allocation Program and Illinois’ compliance with the United States Supreme Court Decree that governs the state’s allowable diversion of water from Lake Michigan will be presented. This presentation will also include a brief overview of Great Lakes regional water supply issues, including Illinois’ unique role in the Great Lakes region as a member of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Water Resources Compact Council. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of some of the broader water resource challenges Illinois and the Northeastern Illinois region will face in the future, and how water management policy may have to adapt.

John Hubsky and Rich Daubert:The Glen Ellyn Public Water Supply System

Glen Ellyn has a full-service Public Works Department with many responsibilities, including the delivery of safe drinking water to residents and businesses in the village for both consumption and fire suppression. Personnel in the department are responsible for the maintenance and repair of approximately 110 miles of water mains and the various water distribution appurtenances, including valves, hydrants, meters, pumps, underground storage reservoirs and elevated water storage tanks. Staff from the department will be presenting on how water conservation applies to the operation and maintenance of public water supply infrastructure. More specifically, topics covered will include water auditing processes, water meter testing, and cutting-edge leak detection and pipe condition assessment technology.

Mr. Anthony Charlton:Sustainable Management of SubURBAN Water Resources

Just a few years ago, remediation work was beginning on the West Branch of the DuPage River to remove years of toxic thorium deposit that had spread throughout an eight-mile stretch of the river. During this time, DuPage County Stormwater Management and its partners saw an opportunity to not only return the river to its pre-contamination condition, but to restore it to its pre-urbanization condition. Using diverse funding, vast partnerships and a suite of award-winning flood control and water quality projects, the West Branch went from an EPA Superfund Cleanup Site to a thriving ecosystem benefiting both aquatic and human lives.

Mr. Stephen McCracken:Watershed Planning for Meeting the Aquatic Life Goal

Improvements in stream ecology in Illinois have not kept pace with improvements in point source control. A consensus view is developing that this is because the current tools employed by regulatory agencies ignore a number of pervasive causes of degradation and cause significant misallocations of resources. In an attempt to offer a more coherent and goal-orientated approach, the DRSCW had created a program based on a geographically dense biological, chemical and physical data set. The data is then used to identify and prioritize impediments to local stream ecology on a micro level, impediments that can then be addressed. In the DRSCW watersheds the detailed mapping of aquatic assemblages and physical conditions alongside ambient chemistry suggests remedies for meeting the aquatic life goal quite different to those being prioritized in local NPDES permits. The DRSCW has proposed a watershed management model that would test if this approach can cost effectively improve aquatic assemblages. The presentation will cover study design, data analysis, stressor identification and preliminary results from project implementation.

 

Crying Earth Rise Up (2015)

Tuesday, March 7, 7 p.m.*

When Debra White Plume’s drinking water tests high for radiation, she sets out to determine the cause. What she finds exposes the human cost of uranium mining and its impact for the Pine Ridge Reservation and Great Plains drinking water. Sharon Karp, film editor for Crying Earth Rise Up will serve as discussion leader.

This film is also part of the One Earth Film Festival

One Earth Film Festival

Sponsored by COD Liberal Arts Division

College of DuPage Liberal Arts

 

Death by Design (2016)

Thursday, March 9, 7 p.m.

Consumers love—and live on—their smartphones, tablets and laptops. In an investigation that spans the globe, filmmaker Sue Williams investigates the underbelly of the electronics industry and reveals how even the smallest devices have deadly environmental and health costs.

This film is also part of the One Earth Film Festival

One Earth Film Festival

Sponsored by the Glen Ellyn Environmental Commission

Glen Ellyn Environmental Commission

 

Living Downstream (2013)

Wednesday, April 19, 7 p.m.*

Based on the acclaimed book by ecologist and cancer survivor Sandra Steingraber, this poetic film follows Steingraber during one pivotal year as she travels across North America, working to break the silence about cancer and its environmental links.

Sponsored by the COD Foundation

College of DuPage Foundation

 

Erin Brockovich (2000)

Wednesday, April 26, 7 p.m.*

This feature film tells the story of Erin Brockovich, a young mother who convinces attorney Ed Masry to hire her and promptly stumbles upon a monumental law case against a giant corporation. Brockovich is determined to take on this powerful adversary even though no law firm had dared to do it before.

Sponsored by the COD Library

College fo DuPage Library

 

All films will be shown in the Health and Science Center (HSC), Room 1234. The screenings are free and open to the public. There will be a Q & A discussion after each screening.

 

For more information, contact:

Deborah Adelman

(630) 942-3406
adelman@cod.edu

Laura Burt-Nicholas

(630) 942-3907
burt-nicholasl@cod.edu

Shamili Ajgaonkar

(630) 942-2123
sandifor@cod.edu

For Americans with Disabilities Act accommodations, call (630) 942-2141 (voice) or (630) 858-9692 (TDD).

 

Watershed Model Demonstration

SCARCE  College of DuPage Environmental Club

* Plan to arrive a little early to check out the Watershed Model. An hour before selected film screenings, SCARCE, a local community organization and the COD Environmental Club, will demonstrate the Watershed Model to teach about water pollution.

 

2016 Events

The Natural Resources Symposium Series is free, accessible, and open to the entire COD community and campus.  The symposia provide a platform for learning and discussion about contemporary natural resource and environmental issues.

The first symposium of the series - Is a Post-Carbon Future Possible and How Do We Get There? - will explore how alternative energy sources factor into a secure energy policy that is both environmentally and economically sustainable. 

To set the stage for the symposium, please join us on Wednesday, Oct. 26 at 6 p.m. for a screening of SWITCH.  In this film, Dr. Scott W. Tinker travels the world to discover how the shift from coal and oil to alternative energies will likely happen. SWITCH changes the energy conversation from one that is polarized and unproductive to one that focuses on practical realities and encourages a balanced understanding.

Film author Scott W. Tinker, director of the Bureau of Economic Geology, the State Geologist of Texas, will kick off the symposium at 9 a.m., Thursday, Oct. 27 with his insights into Global Energy 20/20.

Also joining in the conversation will be:

Alexis Cain, Environmental Scientist from USEPA Region 5 Air and Radiation Division,  who will address energy policy within the proposed Clean Power Plan,

Mark Williamson from Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Energy Division,  to share how we may move toward a Sustainable Nuclear Energy System, and

Jessica Collingsworth, Energy Policy Analyst and Advocate from the Union of Concerned Scientists Midwest Office, to discuss potential Policies to Reduce Carbon Emissions.

The Natural Resources Symposium Series is funded by the COD Foundation and supported by the student membership of the COD Environmental Club.

College of DuPage Foundation   College of DuPage Environmental Club

Symposium Schedule

Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016

Student Services Center (SSC), Room 3245

8:30 a.m. Welcome, Diana Strode, Adam Woodard, Haley Schreiber-Deam

9 to 9:50 a.m. Keynote Speaker—Scott W. Tinker, Director, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, Global Energy 20/20

10 to 10:30 a.m. Alexis Cain, USEPA Region 5, The Clean Power Plan

10:40 to 11:10 a.m. Mark Williamson, Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Towards a Sustainable Nuclear Energy System

11:20 to 11:50 a.m. Jessica Collingsworth, Midwest Energy Analyst/Advocate, Union of Concerned Scientists, Policies to Reduce Carbon Pollution

Speakers

Scott W. Tinker: Dr. Scott W. Tinker's passion is bringing academe, government, industry and NGOs together into what he calls the “radical middle” to address major societal issues in energy, environment and the economy. Scott is director of the 250-person Bureau of Economic Geology, the State Geologist of Texas, and a professor holding the Allday Endowed Chair in the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas at Austin. Tinker has been president of the Association of American State Geologists, the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), the Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies (GCAGS), and is the current president of the American Geosciences Institute. Tinker, who has visited more than 50 countries and given over 600 keynote and invited lectures to government, industry, academia and the public, is an AAPG Halbouty Outstanding Leadership Medalist, GCAGS Boyd Medalist, Fellow of the Geologic Society of America and has been broadly awarded for engaging the public in science. Tinker serves on many private, public, academic, and government boards and councils and he co-produced and is featured in the award-winning energy documentary, Switch, which is in over 1,000 universities and has been seen by more than 10 million viewers globally.

Alexis Cain: Alexis Cain is an environmental scientist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5 in Chicago. He has been with USEPA for 21 years, all of it in the Air and Radiation Division in Region 5. He holds a master’s degree in international affairs from The American University and a master’s degree in environmental studies from Yale University. Cain is Region 5’s lead for implementation of the Clean Power Plan and for promoting clean energy, and also performs analysis of air toxics issues.

Mark Williamson: Dr. Mark A. Williamson leads a multidisciplinary research and development organization with programs in nuclear fuel reprocessing, radioactive waste management, safeguards and medical isotopes in the Nuclear Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory. Dr. Williamson’s technical expertise is in developing electrochemical processing technologies for nuclear energy systems. He has extensive experience in electrochemical process design, development and demonstration; equipment engineering; and facility design. His work includes the transformation of unit operations from concept to pilot-scale with a focus on technology commercialization. He is active in exploring safeguards technologies relevant to electrochemical processing systems.

Jessica Collingsworth: Jessica Collingsworth is an energy policy analyst and advocate for UCS’s Midwest office, in the Climate and Energy program. She focuses on sensible energy policies that support the development of renewable energy and energy efficiency resources in the Midwest region, and that result in significant reductions of global warming emissions. Collingsworth is the state lead for UCS’ work in Illinois, where she works closely with UCS members and supporters, experts, and fellow advocates to support clean energy polices within the state. She also provides clean energy policy analysis to legislative and regulatory agencies throughout the Midwest, and works to develop legislative strategies to target key decision makers. Before working at UCS, Collingsworth was a senior policy associate at the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, a membership organization working to promote energy efficiency in the 13 Midwestern states, for nearly seven years. She also serves as the Vice President of the Illinois Environmental Council’s young professional’s board. She has a master’s degree in public administration with a concentration in nonprofit management from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Abstracts

Scott W. Tinker: Energy 20/20

The world of energy can be blurry and confusing, with strong and seemingly educated opinions on several sides of an issue. Are oil and gas really running out and if so, why do we keep using them? Is coal “bad?” Is fracking destroying the environment? Are renewable forms of energy better, or do they also have challenges? Is switching to renewable energy just a matter of political will? Are fossil and nuclear energies environmentally “dirty” and renewable energy “clean?” Can we “store” energy, and why would that matter? It is really the hottest time in earth history and is carbon the villain? I will touch these and other questions in an effort to demystify, hopefully depoliticize, and perhaps help bring into focus the complex and vitally important world of energy.

Alexis Cain: The Clean Power Plan

The Clean Power Plan is a historic and important step in reducing carbon pollution from power plants that takes real action on climate change. Shaped by years of unprecedented outreach and public engagement, the final Clean Power Plan is fair, flexible and designed to strengthen the fast-growing trend toward cleaner and lower-polluting American energy. With strong but achievable standards for power plants, and customized goals for states to cut the carbon pollution that is driving climate change, the Clean Power Plan provides national consistency, accountability and a level playing field while reflecting each state’s energy mix. It also shows the world that the United States is committed to leading global efforts to address climate change. On Feb. 9, 2016, the Supreme Court stayed implementation of the Clean Power Plan pending judicial review. The Court’s decision was not on the merits of the rule. EPA firmly believes the Clean Power Plan will be upheld when the merits are considered because the rule rests on strong scientific and legal foundations.

Mark Williamson: Towards a Sustainable Nuclear Energy System

Nuclear energy production accounts for more than 60 percent of the carbon-free electricity produced in the United States. However, the current light water reactors use only about four percent of the energy content in the nuclear fuel before the fuel is discharged for disposal. Significant improvement in resource utilization can be achieved through recycling the used nuclear fuel. Electrochemical processing provides a robust path for the transition from the once-through to a closed nuclear fuel cycle thereby increasing resource utilization and allowing fission product waste to be encapsulated in engineered waste forms designed for geologic storage. Selective combination of electrochemical processing technologies enables the recovery of actinides from light water reactor fuel for use in fast reactor systems as well as the recycle of actinides discharged from fast reactors. Close-coupling of the fuel treatment and fabrication facility with the nuclear system reduces the storage requirements for used and fresh fuel, eliminates the transportation of the radioactive materials between sites and potentially yields cost savings. This presentation will provide a summary of the electrochemical technology development activities at Argonne using examples from systems designed to treat used light water and fast reactor fuel.

Jessica Collingsworth: The Clean Power Plan and other Policies to Reduce Carbon Pollution

This presentation will look at federal and state policies that aim to reduce carbon pollution including the Clean Power Plan, the Clean Energy Incentive Program, the Solar Investment Tax Credit and the Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit extensions, and the Illinois Clean Jobs Bill.

Sustainability Film and Discussion Series

All films will be shown in the Health and Science Center (HSC), Room 1234. The screenings are free and open to the public. There will be a Q&A discussion after each screening.

SCARCE

*30 minutes before each film screening SCARCE, a local community educational organization, will demonstrate the Energy Bike to teach energy conservation. Please plan to arrive early to test out the bike.

Cape Spin! An American Power Struggle (2013)

Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2 p.m.*

Cape Spin! tells the surreal, fascinating, tragicomic story of the battle over America’s first proposed offshore wind farm and most controversial clean energy project, Cape Wind. Strange alliances formed for and against: Kennedys, Kochs, and everyday folks battle with the developer and green groups over the future of American power. This films tells both sides of the story. With its revolutionary soundtrack Cape Spin! is “a gripping and entertaining study of eco-capitalism and grassroots democracy.” Sponsored by the COD Library.

SWTICH Energy Film and Education Project

Switch

Wednesday, Oct. 26, 6 p.m.*

Every energy resource—fossil, nuclear, renewable —is undergoing profound changes. The shift from coal and oil to the energies of tomorrow is underway. This transition is the subject of Switch. The film travels the world to discover how this switch is most likely to happen. Switch highlights a changing energy conversation—from polarized and unproductive to a focus on practical realities, encouraging a balanced understanding. Film author, Scott W. Tinker will be presenting at the COD Natural Resource Symposium on Thursday, Oct. 27, in the Student Services Center (SSC), Room 3245, at 9 a.m. Funded by the COD Foundation. Sponsored by the Natural Resource Symposium Series and the COD Environmental Club.

The Babushkas of Chernobyl (2015)

Monday, Nov. 7, 1 p.m.*

In the radioactive Dead Zone surrounding Chernobyl’s Reactor No. 4, a defiant community of women scratches out an existence on some of the most toxic land on Earth. They share this hauntingly beautiful but lethal landscape with an assortment of scientists, soldiers, and even ‘stalkers’—young thrill-seekers who sneak in to pursue post-apocalyptic video game-inspired fantasies. Following three central characters, women who defy the authorities and endanger their own health to return after the disaster, the film is a remarkable tale about the pull of home, the healing power of shaping one’s destiny and the subjective nature of risk. Sponsored by the COD Library.

College of DuPage

425 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn IL, 60137

(630) 942-2800 (Main)

(630) 942-3000 (Student Services)

  2017 College of DuPage