Black History Month 2018

National Theme:

African-Americans in Times of War

Carter G. Woodson once wrote that “if you teach the Negro that he has accomplished as much good as any other race he will aspire to equality and justice without regard to race.” Woodson understood well the implications associated with the denial of access to knowledge, and he called attention to the crisis that resulted from persistently imposed racial barriers to equal education. The crisis in black education first began in the days of slavery when it was unlawful for slaves to learn to read and write. In pre-Civil War northern cities, free blacks were forced as children to walk long distances past white schools on their way to the one school relegated solely to them. Whether by laws, policies, or practices, racially separated schools remained the norm in America from the late nineteenth century well into our own time.

Throughout the last quarter of the twentieth century and continuing today, the crisis in black education has grown significantly in urban neighborhoods where public schools lack resources, endure overcrowding, exhibit a racial achievement gap, and confront policies that fail to deliver substantive opportunities. The touted benefits of education remain elusive to many blacks of all ages. Tragically, some poorly performing schools serve as pipelines to prison for youths.

Yet, African American history is rich in centuries-old efforts of resistance to this crisis: the slaves’ surreptitious endeavors to learn; the rise of black colleges and universities after the Civil War; unrelenting battles in the courts; the black history movement; the freedom schools of the 1960s; and local community-based academic and mentorship programs that inspire a love of learning and thirst for achievement. Addressing the crisis in black education should be considered one of the most important goals in America’s past, present, and future.

From the Association For The Study Of African American Life And History:  The Founders of Black History Month

BLACK HISTORY MONTH 2018

OPENING CELEBRATION

Monday, Feb. 5


PHOTO EXHIBIT

Thursday, Feb. 1 to Sunday, April 15


BLACK STUDENT ALLIANCE (BSA)

College of DuPage BSA will host three events during the month featuring:

Student Panel Discussion, Thursday, Feb. 1

Demonstration of Peace: The Pan African Experience, Thursday, Feb. 8

Black Inventors Fair, Thursday, Feb. 22


THE ANNUAL AFRICAN-AMERICAN READ-IN

Wednesday, Feb. 7

The National African-American Read-In is the nation’s first and oldest event dedicated to diversity in literature. A national literacy initiative of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the event is sponsored on campus by the College of DuPage Library.


LIVING LEADERSHIP FILM

ACCIDENTAL COURTESY

Wednesday, Feb. 7

African-American musician Daryl Davis has played all over the world with legends like Chuck Berry and Little Richard. In his off hours, Davis likes to meet and befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan in search of the answer to his question: “How can you hate me if you don’t even know me.”


ART EXHIBIT—UNITE

Thursday, Feb. 8 to Saturday, April 7 Featuring works from artist Faheem Majeed McAninch Arts Center (MAC), Cleve Carny Art Gallery

OPENING POSTPONED: Thursday, Feb. 8
RESCHEDULED TO: Saturday, Feb. 17

Faheem Majeed has created an installation centered on a 20-foot long sculpture constructed of handmade OSB (particle board). The board is meant to reference the ubiquitous panels used to board-up empty buildings and homes in the Chicago area. Unlike those boards, all of the individual wood chips that make up Majeed’s panels are hand colored with bright Kool-Aid like hues. The resulting multicolored boards reference painting and suggest a different, and more positive, view of what is often seen as a symbol of decline and neglect.


GUEST SPEAKER

ARTIST FAHEEM MAJEED

Tuesday, Feb. 13

A resident of the South Shore neighborhood in Chicago, Faheem Majeed often looks to the material makeup of his neighborhood and surrounding areas as an entry point into larger questions around civic-mindedness, community activism and institutional racism.


GUEST SPEAKER

VICKI CLARK

SERVANT LEADERSHIP AND THE IMPORTANCE OF DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IN ORGANIZATIONS

Tuesday, Feb. 13

Vicki Clark has devoted 25 years of her life to building capacity in organizations. A noted facilitator, consultant and trainer, she has extensive experience working in the non-profit, government and private sectors.


GLOBAL FLICKS

LIKE COTTON TWINES

Wednesday, Feb. 14

An American volunteer teaching at a remote school in Africa tries to save one of his young students from a religious custom in which she will be offered as a slave to the gods.


A TASTE OF HISTORY: HOSTED BY SODEXO

Thursday, Feb. 15

College of DuPage students, faculty and staff are invited to explore the cuisines of the Pan African culture and discover the inspirations behind the preparation of cuisines that have touched generations. Music in the cafeteria will accompany the experience.


90.9fm WDCB Program

Sun, Feb. 18
The college’s public radio station - 90.9fm WDCB - will dedicate the entire one-hour program “First Light” from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. to broadcasting excerpts from this year’s African-American Read-In.


COLLEGE OF DUPAGE PANEL DISCUSSION AFRICAN-AMERICANS IN TIMES OF WAR

Monday, Feb. 19

An interactive faculty, staff and student discussion on the trials and triumphs of African- American service men and women and the impacts on a culture during times of war.

Moderated by President Ann Rondeau


GUEST SPEAKER

ENTREPRENEUR RODNEY WALKER
TOUGH TIMES DON’T LAST; TOUGH PEOPLE DO

Wednesday, Feb. 21

From his father being incarcerated, to being placed in 12 different foster homes, Rodney chose to grow and persevere regardless of his past. He received his bachelor’s degree from Morehouse College, his master’s degree from Yale University, and he is now working on his Ed.D. at Harvard University. By sharing his story, he is helping students overcome their past and begin the healing process so that they can be successful individuals—in school, business and their lives.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH 2018

EXPRESSIONS COMPETITION

Guided by a quote from an African-American veteran, students are invited to submit an essay, a story, a piece of art or music, a poem, or any other form of expression.

APOLLO LIVE

STUDENT TALENT COMPETITION

Friday, March 9


BLACK HISTORY MONTH 2018
CLOSING CEREMONY FEATURING AFRIKAN DANCE AND MUSIC INSTITUTE

Monday, Feb. 26


 

Contact Information

Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion
Student Services Center (SSC), Room 2225E

David A. Swope Sr.
Manager, Student Diversity and Inclusion
(630) 942-2565 
FAX: (630) 942-2136
Office Hours: Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.